BackPlanting

How to plant

Our standard planting instructions are

Soak card in water until soft. Place card on seed raising mix (in pot or ground). Lightly cover with more mix, water and keep moist. Germination should take 7 - 21 days.

These (or something similar) would normally be included in your artwork which we would then print on your seeded paper. This also applies to a description of the seeds (or at least mention of what the seeds are), which most people would include in their artwork.

Any pre-printed items (such as generic Christmas cards) that we supply from stock will already have these planting instructions and seed identification printed.

Any seeded paper we supply to you unprinted and blank will not have planting instructions pre-printed. It will then be up to you to print any instructions (and seed description) you want on the paper.

Note that growth success is dependent on the paper being kept moist (and therefore soft) until after the seeds have germinated. Many seeds are embedded in the thickness of the paper and if it dries and hardens, the shoots of the newly germinating seeds will not be able to push through.

Where to plant

Australia has a chequered history of importing plants and animals which have ended up causing major problems to the native flora and fauna. This might have been done deliberately in an attempt to cope with another problem (eg cane toads to reduce the number of snakes in the sugar cane plantations of north Queensland) or accidentally (as in the case of Paterson’s Curse or lantana). However, there is an unfortunately very long list of plants and weeds that cause major problems within the Australian landscape. Paper-Go-Round does not want to cause any more problems, so we are careful about what seeds we offer.

We think you, too, should be careful about where you plant our seeded paper. Herb and vegetable seeds are obviously suitable for planting in a garden or back yard. We also offer a wide range of Australian natives. We recommend that these, too, are planted in a back yard to give easy access for watering and keeping the newly planted seeded paper moist. This also acts as a bit of a safeguard in case the particular plant is liable to establish itself in your local micro-climate and become a local pest.

Most Australian back yards are in built up areas where there is already a wide range of exotic and non-local plants and trees. The addition of some Australian native trees and shrubs in these areas is likely to be of great benefit to the bird, insect and animal life. However, in more rural or bush situations, it becomes more important to protect the local area and maintain the indigenous plants that may have adapted to the prevailing micro-climate and soil condition. This adaptation can mean even plants of the same species will develop peculiarities specific to that local area (such as how high they grow). So we recommend planting in your garden or back yard.